News

Monday, Jan 22, 2018

Frequent armed warfare in many of Africa’s nature reserves has contributed to the decline of some of the continent’s iconic beasts. To understand the overall effect of warfare on wildlife, Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle at Princeton University analysed data collected between 1946 and 2010 on more than 250 populations of large herbivorous...

Monday, Jan 22, 2018

Corina Tarnita deciphers bizarre patterns in the soil created by competing life-forms. She’s found that they can reveal whether an ecosystem is thriving or on the verge of collapse. Of all the patterns Tarnita explores, one of the most enchantingly enigmatic are fairy circles: barren round patches that dot the grasslands of Namibia like...

Wednesday, Jan 17, 2018

Assistant professor Corina Tarnita conducts fascinating research on the causes and consequences of emergent patterns in complex systems, such as the regular vegetation patterns found in arid ecosystems worldwide. Her journey to get to this place in her career is not a conventional one.

Tuesday, Nov 28, 2017

The arrival 36 years ago of a strange bird to a remote island in the Galápagos archipelago has provided direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. On Nov.

Tuesday, Nov 14, 2017

Matt Grobis, EEB graduate student, and friends decided to take a stab at data visualization: for three weeks they collected data about transportation and travel. Matt decided to quantify his walks to work. He used the GPS Logger for Android app to get 1...

Wednesday, Sep 20, 2017

The Grants’ legendary explorations of the group of 18 bird species known as Darwin’s finches that populate the Galápagos island of Daphne Major — which is in an entirely natural state unaffected by humans — over four decades have produced an array of dazzling insights into evolutionary theory.

Wednesday, Sep 20, 2017

“This is one of the only instances I’ve ever heard of where you can have cost-negative carbon sequestration,” said Timothy Treuer, co-lead author of the study and a graduate student in Princeton’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Wednesday, Jul 19, 2017

Researchers identify a common underlying genetic basis for social behavior in dogs and humans. Co-lead authors Bridgett vonHoldt, assistant professor in EEB, and Emily Shuldiner, a 2016 Princeton alumna, worked together to pinpoint the commonalities in the genetic architecture of Williams-Beuren syndrome and canine tameness.

Tuesday, Jul 11, 2017

Sims studied the coral reefs of Bermuda and found that nitrogen from polluted groundwater inhibits coral growth, but that healthy fish populations and relatively low levels of phosphate pollution have allowed the reefs to remain stable in spite of pollution coming from the groundwater.

Thursday, Jun 29, 2017

A pair of bald eagles in British Columbia’s Shoal Harbour Migratory Bird Sanctuary snatched up two red-tailed hawk chicks and brought them back to their nest — alive. While one hawklet became a meal, the other was fed by the eagles. “The fact that the eagles are feeding it is actually not surprising,” said Christina Riehl, a biologist at...

Pages