News

Tuesday, Jun 18, 2019

Princeton graduate student, Lu Yang, and undergraduate students, Mairana Wu and Adam Rosenstein, work with Professor Andolfatto to look at how the repeated evolutionary specialization of distantly related insects to cardenolide-containing host plants provides a stunning example of parallel adaptation.

Monday, Jun 17, 2019

Rob Pringle led an international team of researchers to investigate how invading predators affect species diversity. A leading cause of extinction is the introduction of predators into an isolated system like an island or a lake.

Monday, Jun 10, 2019

Princeton University awarded honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Tuesday, June 4, to six individuals for their contributions to education, literature, public service, science and space travel.  Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber awarded degrees to Dr.

Monday, Apr 29, 2019

The egg is perhaps nature’s most perfect life support system. These remarkable structures nurture new life; protecting it from the outside world at the same time as allowing it to breathe. They are strong enough to withstand the full weight of an incubating parent and weak enough for a hatchling to break free. But how is an egg made? Why are...

Thursday, Apr 11, 2019

Eric and Wendy Schmidt announced that Saki Takahashi, a 2019 graduate alumna, is one of 20 new Schmidt Science Fellows — a program of Schmidt Futures, in partnership with the Rhodes Trust. Takahashi works to understand the spread of infectious diseases. She completed a Ph.D. this year with Jessica Metcalf, an assistant professor of EEB and...

Thursday, Apr 11, 2019

Levine, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB), was recognized by Ecological Society of America (the world’s largest professional organization of ecologists) “for research that fundamentally advances understanding of biological invasions and species coexistence, often by deploying creative, highly controlled experimental units...

Monday, Mar 11, 2019

A team of ecologists including Princeton's Rob Pringle, Corina Tarnita, Justine Atkins and Arjun Potter took advantage of a rare opportunity to study what happens to an ecosystem when large carnivores are wiped out (in this case through past civil war). Using a series of experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, the ecologists...

Monday, Feb 25, 2019

Chris Tokita, an EEB graduate student who works with associate professor Corina Tarnita, is partially funded by a fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Tokita and Tarnita work to create computational models for how social groups — including ants and humans — develop properties like division of labor and social networks.

Wednesday, Dec 26, 2018

Though red wolves were declared extinct in the wild by 1980, a team of biologists has found their DNA in a group of canines living on Galveston Island off the coast of Texas. “This is a remarkable finding, as red wolves were declared extinct in this region over 35 years ago and remain critically endangered,” said Elizabeth Heppenheimer, a...

Thursday, Dec 13, 2018

Associate professor Andrea Graham and graduate student Jackie Leung drafted a kid-friendly version of their research on mice in Biomedical Science Journal for Kids.  The bodies of humans and mice have a lot in common. So scientists often use mice (Mus musculus) as a model organism (or stand-in) to mimic human diseases and...

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