News

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017

Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous “fairy circles” of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency.

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2017

A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.

Sunday, Jan 1, 2017

Sophomore Camden Olson’s desire to have a career training service dogs has led her to major in ecology and evolutionary biology, and she will train and study service animals for her senior thesis.

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Monday, Nov 21, 2016

Measles, one of the world’s most contagious diseases, can spread more quickly in schools than previously thought, according to Princeton University-led research. The researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the only sure...

Thursday, Oct 20, 2016

NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O’Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that might be foraging for food or seeking shade from...

Thursday, Apr 21, 2016

Scientists from Princeton University and Uppsala University in Sweden have identified a specific gene that within a year helped spur a permanent physical change in a finch species in response to a drought-induced food shortage. The findings provide a genetic basis for natural selection that, when combined with observational data, could serve as...

Monday, Dec 14, 2015

We think of chitchat and small talk as the things people say to pass the time or kill an awkward silence. New research suggests, however, that these idle conversations could be a social-bonding tool passed down from primates.

 

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Monday, Dec 14, 2015

Christina Riehl, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was, as a Princeton graduate student, the first to study and document the extraordinary breeding and nesting behavior of the greater ani bird species.

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