Unexpected consequences of interventions for vector-borne diseases

Thu, Oct 3, 2019, 12:30 pm

Ecology has a long and rich history of developing mathematical models to understand the processes that drive population dynamics. Applying these same tools to parasite populations and exposing the processes that govern infection dynamics at multiple biological scales is important for understanding parasite biology, explaining observed experimental or natural disease patterns, and evaluating approaches for disease control. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and experimental data, my research focuses on the ecological process regulating the dynamics and outcomes of vector-borne infections. I will describe two projects where nuances of ecological interactions — coinfection in malaria and tri-trophic interactions in Leishmania — can give rise to unexpected, and potentially counterproductive, consequences of efforts to control disease.

Location: 
Guyot 10
Audience: 
Open to public.
Speaker(s): 
Audience: 

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