Open to public

  • FPO: Zoe Volenec

    Fri, Sep 11, 2020, 3:00 pm

    The Princeton University

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

     

     

    announces

     

  • FPO: Lu Yang

    Mon, Aug 31, 2020, 11:00 am

    The Princeton University

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    announces

  • Justine Atkins - FPO

    Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 2:00 pm

    The Princeton University

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    announces

  • FPO: Edward Schrom

    Mon, Aug 10, 2020, 3:00 pm

    The Princeton University

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

     

     

    announces

     

  • New Directions in Research on the Natural History of Human Aging

    Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Human aging in contemporary industrialized populations focuses largely on chronic diseases of aging, including heart disease, diabetes and dementia. These three account for a third of all deaths in the US and UK, and are increasing throughout the rest of the world. To what extent do these characterize what aging might have looked like in our evolutionary past? For example, atherosclerosis has been identified in ancient mummies, leading some to claim that heart disease is a "serial killer that has been stalking mankind for thousands of years".

  • Chemical and Cognitive Ecology: Lessons from poison frogs

    Thu, Dec 6, 2018, 12:30 pm

    How do animals come up with new ways to deal with challenges and opportunities in their environment? My research focuses on understanding how evolutionary innovations in behavior and physiology arise using amphibians as a model clade, as they show tremendous diversity in behavioral and physiological adaptations. I will first discuss our work on chemical ecology and show how poison frogs have evolved the ability to sequester toxins from their diet of ants and mites. Then I will discuss the evolution of parental behavior within the clade.

  • Social Butterflies: Simple cues & rules, complex behavior and life-history consequences

    Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 12:30 pm

    In 10 summers of field studies, I documented male mate-searching behaviors in 5 species of butterflies that span a range familiar among vertebrates: … vagrant encounter, site-fidelity, running a trapline, defending a territory, and “hanging out” at a literal singles’ bar.  The different behaviors produce varied patterns of disappearance from the local population.  In recent years, I have explored vision, flight, and details of behavior to propose simple cues and rules of interaction sufficient to produce the complex behaviors.

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